Lee Ungermann (YHQLD) Took Some Time to Review the Sharp Point Deep Diving Crank Baits

We recently had the chance to review the Sharp Point Deep Diving Crank Baits.  Here is our honest review of the product.
Sharp Point Jigheads is a locally owned and operated business, serving the light tackle and fishing industry. For transparency, this is not a paid review, just an honest opinion of a small range of tackle available from Sharp Point.  

After meeting Simon Carter at a Yak Hunters event, it is clear that he has a passion for what he does, and this is a vital ingredient for any small business. In fact it could be classed as infectious, to say the least. 

After hearing on the grapevine about these deep divers and seeing them on social media, I had to give them a go. After acquiring some of the deep divers, I intended to give them a crack in the freshwater of North Pine Dam to see just how effective they were. 

On a particular day, when the bass had shutdown on vertical jigging with spoons, I tied on one of the white deep diving crankbaits imitating a bony bream which I knew the bass feed on in the lake. 

Now let’s talk hardware, a pet hate of mine is that manufacturers do such a good job of finishing their masterpieces these days that the lures are so lifelike, however they finish them with crappy terminals tackle and it’s a real turn off. Not so with these bad boys. 

Sharp Point runs BK hooks through their crankbaits range, now I had little exposure to these previously, but I can say that I am impressed. They are needle sharp, hold well, and seem to resist corrosion well, although I will confess that I am yet to use these in the brine as yet. They are so sharp however that the only negative is that, like most trebles, they can be dangerous when you have a lively fish in your lap in the yak and exposed swinging trebles: the hooks do what they do, fish or finger.

The quality of the lure on the whole is one of a professional finish, and in discussion with Simon he is refining the finish even further, some of the later versions are pretty speccy, that’s for sure. 

Now a review is not complete without pointing out the good and the bad. Again, this is only our opinion, however one identified drawback I have seen has been the attaching split ring on (only one of the lures) at the tow point, which began to exhibit signs of corrosion, however as I do not generally like these, I removed them anyway. 

Let’s talk internals, the hook split ring attach points are solid and dependable, the internal rattle is also a good addition and makes a loud audible rattle that definitely gains predatory attention.
If you are fishing a system whereby the rattle puts them off, then this lure type is probably not optimal. We have found them great, vary your speed to dial the rattle up and down. 

The large oversized bib is strong and gets these lures down to a shade over 5m depending on the tow length back from the kayak, if you run your lures long in the troll they may go deeper. After checking depth with the sounder over various bottom depths, this is well and truly accurate. 

In terms of de-snagging, use of a simple tackleback type system seems to work well, I have snagged quite a few into underwater trees, rocks and other obstructions. So far, 100% retrieval rate. But knowing your running depth and bottom types will help you out no end with ensuring you minimise this in the first place. As sharp as those hooks are, they seem to retrieve well. 

The action needs to be seen to be believed, it is a solid pulsating loose wobble, really good at a slow retrieve and of course tighter at a faster pace. So far, tested while trolling, it seems to have a better hit/ hookup rate with bass at about 3 km/hr, which is pretty slow. Although this could also have to do with these lazy impoundment brutes, not being fond of cardio. In saying this, the deep divers do tend to have a wicked action at this speed and you can audibly hear the rattle, even in the water close to the boat/kayak.
Now the $64 million dollar question: price? Due to Sharp Point moving into this market, and being a good old Aussie startup, the price point is very reasonable for what you are getting. As they are slowly making a name for themselves and further developing their product, I would suggest the price will begin to increase. Depending on the lures, most are under $10 AU presently, Sharp Point have been running specials on their range which will see you pick up 5 Lures for about $40. At around $8 each, for the quality of the product, well you do the math!  

I am no rocket scientist, but while you check the math, I reckon I am stocking up before the inevitable price increase, as no Aussie handcrafted business product can operate sustainably with these prices. Get in, before the secret gets out. 

So all in all, if you're looking for good, dependable and robust deep divers, check out the Sharpoint range. Send Simon a message on the Sharp Point Jigheads Facebook page, he will hook you up.
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